Skip to main content

Communications: Books at UTM

The Department of Communications offers a major and minor that prepare you for a wide range of media and communication-related careers.

Books at Paul Meek Library

Interesting Books

The Sun and the Moon

The Sun and the Moon tells the delightful, entertaining, and surprisingly true story of how in the summer of 1835 a series of articles in the Sun , the first of the city's “penny papers,” convinced the citizens of New York that the moon was inhabited.
Six articles, purporting to reveal the lunar discoveries made by a world-famous British astronomer, described the life found on the moon—including unicorns, beavers that walked upright, and, strangest of all, four-foot-tall flying man-bats. The series quickly became the most widely circulated newspaper story of the era. And the Sun , a brash working-class upstart less than two years old, had become the most widely read newspaper in the world.

Empire of Illusion

Chris Hedges argues that we now live in two societies: one, the minority, functions in a print-based, literate world, able to cope with complexity and to separate illusion from truth. The other, a growing majority, is retreating from a reality-based world into one of false certainty and magic. In this "other society," comforting, reassuring images, fantasies, slogans and a celebration of violence push reality, complexity and nuance to the margins. The worse reality becomes, the less a beleaguered population wants to hear about it and the more it distracts itself with squalid pseudo-events of celebrity breakdowns, gossip and trivia. These are the debauched revels of a dying culture.

From Cronkite to Colbert

With increasing numbers of people tuning out the nightly news and media consumption falling, late-night comedians have become some of the most important newscasters in the country. From Cronkite to Colbert explains why.

Bunk

"Award-winning poet and critic Kevin Young traces the history of the hoax as a peculiarly American phenomenon--the legacy of P.T. Barnum's 'humbug' culminating with the currency of Donald J. Trump's 'fake news'. Disturbingly, Young finds that fakery is woven from stereotype and suspicion, with race being the most insidious American hoax of all. He chronicles how Barnum came to fame by displaying figures like Joice Heth, a black woman whom he pretended was the 161-year-old nursemaid to George Washington, and 'What Is It?', an African American man Barnum professed was a newly discovered missing link in evolution. Bunk then turns to the hoaxing of history and the ways that forgers, plagiarists, and journalistic fakers invent backstories and falsehoods to sell us lies about themselves and about the world in our own time, from pretend Native Americans like Nasdijj to the deadly imposture of Clark Rockefeller, from the made-up memoirs of James Frey to the identity theft of Rachel Dolezal. This brilliant and timely work asks what it means to live in a post-factual world of 'truthiness' where everything is up for interpretation and everyone is subject to a pervasive cynicism that damages our ideas of reality, fact, and art."

Partisan Journalism

In Partisan Journalism: A History of Media Bias in the United States Jim A. Kuypers guides readers on a journey through American journalistic history, focusing on the warring notions of objectivity and partisanship. Kuypers shows how the American journalistic tradition grew from partisan roots and, with only a brief period of objectivity in between, has returned to those roots today.

Browse the shelves

 Sometimes wandering the shelves is a useful way to do research. If you can find one book on a topic, others like it will be sitting on the same shelf.  Be sure to look in both the Reference collection on the first floor for general helps like dictionaries and encyclopedias, and in the circulating collection on the second floor for books you can take with you. These numbers work for most other academic libraries as well

Class H    Social sciences

subclass HF   Commerce

HF5801+     Advertising

subclass HM   Sociology

HM263+      Public relations

Class P    Language

P87-96        Communication. Mass media

P93.5+        Visual communication

subclass PN   Literature (general)

PN1990+     Broadcasting

PN4699+     Journalism. The periodical press, etc.


     Subject Headings 

Use a subject search in the PML catalog to identify books and other materials in a particular subject area. Listed below are headings for a subject search in journalism and mass communications

Advertising Journalism Social aspects
American Newspapers Journalism United States History
Broadcast Journalism Journalistic Ethics
Community Newspapers Journalists Biography
Copy editing Journalists United States
Editorials Mass media United States History 
Ethnic Press News Agencies
Feature Stories Newspaper Publishing
Foreign News Newspapers
Freedom of the press Online journalism
Freelance Journalism Periodicals
Interviewing in journalism Photojournalism
Investigative reporting Press
Journalism Press and politics United States
Journalism Editing Press and propaganda
Journalism History Public relations
Journalism Tennessee History Reporters and Reporting
Journalism Objectivity Television
Journalism Political aspects Visual communication


Books at UTM Library

Communication-themed Novels

It Can't Happen Here

It Can't Happen Here is the only one of Sinclair Lewis's later novels to match the power of Main Street, Babbitt, and Arrowsmith. A cautionary tale about the fragility of democracy, it is an alarming, eerily timeless look at how fascism could take hold in America.

1984

The year is 1984, and life in Oceania is ruled by the Party. Under the gaze of Big Brother, Winston Smith yearns for intimacy and love – “thought crimes” that, if uncovered, would mean imprisonment, or death. But Winston is not alone in his defiance, and an illicit affair will draw him into the mysterious Brotherhood and the realities of resistance.
Nineteen Eighty-Four has been described as chilling, absorbing, satirical, momentous, prophetic and terrifying. It is all these things, and more.

Scoop

Scoop is a 1938 novel by the English writer Evelyn Waugh. It is a satire of sensationalist journalism and foreign correspondents.